NVENC is faster with iGPU disabled

  • I just noticed an interesting aspect about NVENC exporting:


    When having both GPUs enabled (GTX 980 TI and iGPU in my i7 8700K) premiere used the iGPU for decoding and the GTX 980 TI for encoding. I expected this would speed everything up ... But it was rather slowing down!


    iGPU + GTX: 155 FPS

    GTX only: 250 FPS


    So if you are having a similar setup try to disable the iGPU when exporting with NVENC. It might be faster!


    Edit: It might be enough to disable Intel GPU decoding in the premiere preferences. No need to disbale it in the BIOS.

  • Spot on.


    This also applies to effect plugins, many simply take the first GPU offering OpenCL for example, and in pretty much most cases the internal iGPU comes first. If you have a dedicated high-end GPU, totally disable the iGPU at bios level, it really doesn't help one bit. Though IceLake might change that landscape in the near future.

  • nah i dont think so

    iGpu helps a lot in playback + my 4k 5 min export was 10 seconds faster with igpu enabled and it makes premiere use the DGPU and iGPU together so premiere will be faster with lower CPU usage so i recommend enabling igpu

  • What works for one may not work for another, but in general if you have a desktop with high-end gpu and 12 core i7, enabling iGPU brings nothing to the table.


    For me personally across 4 workstations there is absolutely no speed increase, in many cases a slowdown.


    Indeed all down to workflow requirements, driver versions, hardware etc., many users with off-the-shelf laptops/desktops hit cpu throttling the moment both the igpu and cpu hit max load, so this in return has a negative impact.


    So many variables.


    4k (150-200mbit) footage scrubbing in my timelines is wayyy smoother with igpu turned off.


    One would presume a competent user will have taken the suggestion which they may never have considered before and just tried it both with on and off and see if it makes a difference in their workflow on their own hardware.